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First

As soon as Geoff switched his shower off, my mobile phone rang. I fished it out of my handbag and answered the call.


“Hey, bride,” I greeted Callista with a grin. “How are you?”


“Well, really well, glowing,” she answered, in a dreamy tone. “Tom’s just out to get some dinner. I just thought I’d call to thank you for everything you did. Thank you.”

 

“Oh, no worries, Callista, it was my pleasure,” I replied. “How’s married life?”


“Pretty good,” Callista answered. “We’ve been having a lot of fun.”


She giggled.


“I’ll leave it at that,” I decided.

 

Callista chuckled.


“You probably should,” she advised. “We’ve been fortunate that Mum and Dad have been out all day, they’ve just left us alone, which we’ve certainly appreciated. What have you been up to, Nina?”


“Geoff and I are just about to go out for dinner,” I told her.

 

“Awesome.”


“He went to the doctor this morning and got the all clear, so we’re celebrating.”


“That’s such good news,” Callista responded. “I’ll tell Tom, we’re really pleased that he’s alright and that you could both be there.”

 

Soon after, I finished on the phone. Geoff and I headed out to the car to drive to dinner. I could feel butterflies in my stomach, even though I’d never felt more beautiful than when he was smiling across at me while I was driving. We were so lucky to be able to still enjoy a honeymoon period, even after almost a year. Geoff and I arrived at the restaurant. Thankfully, we’d made a booking. It was pretty busy, which wasn’t a surprise considering that it was almost Christmas. We both chose vegetarian options for dinner. It wasn’t a political move, simply that they looked the most delicious of the choices. After we finished dinner, the waiter offered to show us the coffee menu, but both of us were full. Geoff paid for the meal.


“Thank you,” I said to him as we stepped out into the balmy summer evening, a gentle dusting of rain against our faces.


“My pleasure.”

 

As soon as we were back home and the door was closed, Geoff and I collapsed onto the bed. Our hands ran over each other’s bodies, kissing passionately, drinking each other in. I inched up the bed, with Geoff on top of me, feeling safe in his arms. Instinctively, I started fiddling with the top button of his shirt. Geoff and I parted briefly, both breathing heavily.


“I love you, Geoff,” I gushed.


Geoff beamed.


“I love you too, Nina,” he replied.

 

Geoff and I pressed our lips against each other’s, and resumed, slowly, undressing each other.


“Are you really sure that you want to do this?” Geoff enquired.


“Are you?” I queried.


“Yes, but only if you are,” Geoff answered.

 

I smiled.


“Me too,” I murmured through the darkness.


Geoff gave a nod, which was reciprocated by me. His hands stretched around my body. Geoff pulled down my zipper, pressing its cool metal surface against my back. As my straps slipped from my shoulders, Geoff moved forward. I wrapped my fingers around the side of his neck. Geoff and I pressed our lips together, sharing a hungry, passionate kiss. I reached between us to the centre of his shirt and, with one hand, undid Geoff’s top button. Slowly, I ran my fingertips down his front, carefully undoing the vertical row of small white buttons. Geoff’s creamy skin began to display itself from underneath the fabric. My fingers reached his lower torso and I took the deepest breath.


 

The younger sister of missing Sydney man Mitchell del Reyan, Nina del Reyan lives on Dharug land in western Sydney. She has recently commenced a teaching degree at Macquarie University. Nina loves her family and friends and is deeply committed to finding answers and justice for the families of missing people.


Abbey Sim is the founder of Huldah Media. She is a creative writing, law and theology student who lives on the lands of the Dharug people in Sydney, Australia. Abbey desires to explore themes of hope, love and longing through her storytelling. She is the author of 'Shadow' and 'From the Wild'.


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